919-957-9730

 
Rating 4.9

All My Sons of Raleigh Guide to Wake Forest

All My Sons of Raleigh has developed this guide for those moving to Wake Forest, North Carolina. Contact All My Sons of Raleigh for moving services in the Greater Raleigh and Wake Forest, NC areas.

WAKE FOREST Wake Forest is a town of about 22,000 people located in Wake and Franklin counties in the northeast central region of North Carolina. Wake Forest is located less than an hour from Raleigh and Durham, just north of the state capital. The city is geographically at the intersection of the “fall line” of the North American Piedmont and Atlantic Coastal Plain regions - three hours west of Atlantic Beach, NC and four hours east of the Appalachian range. The city was founded in 1909 and will celebrate its Centennial Celebration in 2009. The area is known to be family-friendly and culturally diverse. Wake Forest offers some of the best shopping, dining, schools, businesses, arts, and medical facilities in North Carolina. The city was appointed by Forbes Magazine as the 20th fastest growing suburb in America.

Wake Forest is home to almost 30,000 residents. The city, very much a college town, has a median age of 33, and a median income of over $56,000 per year. The area boasts a relaxed, family-oriented atmosphere with education and security as priorities. The residents are educated and cultured, and about two-thirds of all residents own their homes. There is a strong local economy that is encouraging to all sized businesses. Wake Forest operates a Council-Manager form of government that features a Mayor, a Board of Commissioners, and a Town Manager appointed by Board to administer municipal affairs.

The Subtropical weather in Wake Forest boasts four, changing seasons, however, on average, there are 220 sunny days a year. The location offers beaches to the east, and mountains to the west. The average yearly temperature is 60 degrees Fahrenheit, and there is an average snowfall of 7.5 inches.

 The city is most well-known for its namesake, Wake Forest University. Wake Forest University was originally founded in 1823 as the Wake Forest Academy for Boys. The North Carolina Baptist Convention bought the campus in 1834 and eventually named it Wake Forest College. The college, which eventually included women, was based in Wake Forest for 122 years. The growth of the school, and the area, were based on the growth of the Raleigh and Gaston Railroad Track in the 1840s. At the request of Wake Forest College leaders, a main railroad station was moved from Forestville to Wake Forest, resulting in an economic boom for the area. Wake Forest College moved to the larger area of Winston-Salem in 1956, and the land was sold to the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary.

The Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary was formed on May 19, 1950, at the Southern Baptist Convention. The Seminary purchased the Wake Forest College campus, which also had Baptist heritage, and began classes September 12, 1951. The institution has grown from 85 students and 3 faculty members to a 500 acre, 12 major building campus. The institution operates on historic Baptist theological principles and responds to ‘controversial cultural issues and equipping churches to do the same’. In addition to the Seminary, the city is located in close proximity to “The Triangle”, which contains Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. Downtown Wake Forest is a thriving area.

The Downtown Revitalization Corporation was formed in 1984 as a volunteer organization. The mission of the group is to add vitality to Downtown Wake Forest. Events hosted by the Downtown Revitalization Corporation include the American Dance Festival, the DuBois Jazz Festival, and concerts at Walnut Creek Amphitheater. Historical Places downtown include The DuBois Center, a school opened in 1926 for African Americans that is now a community center, and the Calvin Jones Historical House (1820), the birthplace of Wake Forest University.

Through a partnership between the City of Raleigh, the Town of Wake Forest and Triangle Transit, the city offers bus service from Wake Forest to downtown Raleigh, a rush-hour express, and a circular service around town. Wake Forest accesses major Interstates I-85 and I-40, and is about 20 miles from Raleigh-Durham International.

EMERGENCY NUMBERS In an emergency dial 911 Wake Forest Police Department (919) 554-6150 Wake Forest Fire Department (919) 556-1966 Time Warner Cable (919) 595-4892 Town of Wake Forest (919) 554-6100 Progress Energy (800) 452-2777 Wake Electric (919) 863-6300 PSNC Energy (877) 776-2427 Telephone-Embarq (919) 556-0080 Trash Collection (919) 554-6120 Republic Waste Services (919) 772-1316 Waste Industries (919) 556-8832 Wake County Public Schools (919) 850-1600 Wake County Private Schools (919) 733-4276 Driver’s License Office (919) 855-6877 License Plate Agency (919) 554-0770 Wake Forest Chamber of Commerce (919) 856-6240 Post Office (800) 275-8777 Wake Forest Public Library (919) 554-8498 Wake County Animal Control (919) 212-PETS (7387) News & Observer (919) 836-5635 Wake Forest Gazette (919) 556-3409 The Wake Weekly (919) 556-3182